This blog is still trying to find its identity. 20 yr old college student. Multi-fandom. Photos, screen caps, rants and whatever I find awesome

 

foxings-and-fables:


So this little cigarette right here has sparked a whole new brand of TFiOS hate, much of which is coming from people who claimed to love the book. 
Many people are now pointing out how “pretentious” Augustus is, and I can’t help but think, You’re only just now realizing this. He was written to be a seemingly pretentious and arrogant person. The acknowledgement of this is actually highly important because, without it, the book loses the message that a hero’s journey is that of strength to weakness. 
Augustus Waters has big dreams for himself. He wants to be known and remembered; he wants to be a hero; he wants to be seen as perfect. But there’s already something standing in his way… He has a disability, and society tells him that a person cannot be both perfect and disabled. So what does he do? He creates a persona for himself. He tries to appear older and wiser than he is. But the pretentious side of him is NOT who he truly is. It’s all an act. (This is evident in the fact that he often uses words in the wrong context.)
And when his cancer returns, we begin to see his mask cracking. The true Augustus begins to bleed through… Hazel even takes notice of this from time to time. And by the time we get to the gas station scene, Augustus is no longer the picture of perfection he was when we met him. The play has been canceled. The actor must reveal himself. And he’s revealed to be a weak, defenseless boy, succumbing to the cancer that is made of him. 
THE PRETENTIOUSNESS IS INTENTIONAL. It stands to show Augustus’s journey from flawless to flawed, from strong to weak. It’s the key to understanding that Augustus was the hero he always wanted to be, even if he didn’t realized it. 

Yeah, everyone read this. Because I’m getting a little sick of seeing “LOL IT’S A METAPHOR” on every single post with a cigarette or something else unhealthy in it.

foxings-and-fables:

So this little cigarette right here has sparked a whole new brand of TFiOS hate, much of which is coming from people who claimed to love the book. 

Many people are now pointing out how “pretentious” Augustus is, and I can’t help but think, You’re only just now realizing this. He was written to be a seemingly pretentious and arrogant person. The acknowledgement of this is actually highly important because, without it, the book loses the message that a hero’s journey is that of strength to weakness

Augustus Waters has big dreams for himself. He wants to be known and remembered; he wants to be a hero; he wants to be seen as perfect. But there’s already something standing in his way… He has a disability, and society tells him that a person cannot be both perfect and disabled. So what does he do? He creates a persona for himself. He tries to appear older and wiser than he is. But the pretentious side of him is NOT who he truly is. It’s all an act. (This is evident in the fact that he often uses words in the wrong context.)

And when his cancer returns, we begin to see his mask cracking. The true Augustus begins to bleed through… Hazel even takes notice of this from time to time. And by the time we get to the gas station scene, Augustus is no longer the picture of perfection he was when we met him. The play has been canceled. The actor must reveal himself. And he’s revealed to be a weak, defenseless boy, succumbing to the cancer that is made of him. 

THE PRETENTIOUSNESS IS INTENTIONAL. It stands to show Augustus’s journey from flawless to flawed, from strong to weak. It’s the key to understanding that Augustus was the hero he always wanted to be, even if he didn’t realized it. 

Yeah, everyone read this. Because I’m getting a little sick of seeing “LOL IT’S A METAPHOR” on every single post with a cigarette or something else unhealthy in it.

(Source: tfios-changed-my-life)

wilwheaton:

lunatoneitdown:

have you ever heard a raven talk?

because apparently they can go from severus snape to japanese schoolgirl in .5 seconds.

Ravens are pretty amazing.

(Source: hookbillkoopa)

lecapunk:

fdelopera:

ellenkushner:

msfehrwight:

anastasiusfocht:

Shakespeare in its original 16th century accent

David Crystal, the sex symbol of linguistics!

Can’t reblog this too many times!

This is very important. Especially for us Americans who often feel inferior about our accents performing Shakespeare. We need to remember that Shakespeare’s English sounded much closer to Appalachian American English than it did to modern RP British English.

it’s also interesting that the son linguist says of the OP pronunciations that it connects you with your body more because i remember this post talking about how shakespeare is supposed to get down into your bones.

i can also attest to what he says about making eye contact with your audience when you’re giving the plays in daylight; in tenth grade i gave a performance of mercutio’s “queen mab” monologue to a crowd of, like, 4-7 year olds instead of writing a five page paper and yes, the whole point is that you connect to your audience with shakespeare — by my fourth run through of the monologue, i had little kids coming up into my performance space and moving with me.

they didn’t understand what the hell i was saying, but they knew because i was moving with the monologue that it was something worth paying attention to.

mikulios:

making HONEST ANTAGONISTS who believe they’re in the right and firmly believe in what they’re doing is SO MUCH MORE INTERESTING than making them “crazy” because of some outside influence. make villains who believe they are the protagonists

mistletease:

ohhaiguise:

sirscrewloose:

legendofsherlock:

notenjolras:

#can we please discuss the fact that this movie was made by Americans

#some of us might actually be self-aware

Nobody has to deal with americans more than other americans.

I am an american and I can verify that this is indeed true.

#everyone else gets to be annoyed by Americans from afar #while Americans have to be annoyed by other Americans loudly and up close

(Source: kisedbyfire)